Beekeeper Worries A Bee Disorder Caused Loss Of Two Hives

11 Oct Beekeeper Worries A Bee Disorder Caused Loss Of Two Hives

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Photo: Pandora’s Perspective (Flickr)

Beekeeper George Hegeman says colony collapse disorder normally affects migratory beekeepers who move from orchard to orchard with their bees.

Bloomington’s 6th Annual Cider Festival was tempered over the weekend by the recent disappearance of two large beehives from the Bloomington Community Orchard.

The orchard discovered two empty beehives days before their sixth annual Cider Festival on Saturday.

Orchard Beekeeper George Hegeman says he doesn’t know why the bees disappeared, but he thinks it’s due to a condition called colony collapse disorder.

“Mostly it affects what are called migratory beekeepers, beekeepers who move from orchard to orchard with their bees on a flat-bed truck selling the pollination services,” Hegeman says.

Hegeman says it’s the first time he’s seen this disorder occur in Monroe County and surrounding areas. The community orchard’s hives are stationary — making it even harder to find a cause for the disappearance.

Hegeman says the culprit might be a new chemical being introduced to the community.

“It has to do with the quality of the feed the bees are getting. It may have to do with some new kinds of insecticides that are being used called nornicotinoids,” Hegeman says.

Seven species of yellow-faced bees located in Hawaii were recently added to the list of endangered species.

This is the first time bees have been added to the list in the U.S.

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